Beginner's Guide to Knitted Lace

March 05, 2021 2 min read 0 Comments

Knitted lace

If you are fairly new to knitting, you may think that knitted lace is outside of your skill set. Some lace patterns are a bit complex, but there are simple lace patterns that beginner knitters can master. If learning to knit a lace pattern was on your list of 10 knitting goals for 2021 and you are interested in knitting a lace blanket, super feminine cover up or a cool market bag, we are here to help guide you through knitted lace.

What is Knitted Lace?

The stitches required for lace knitting are a series of increased and decreased stitches that form a lace pattern. Some lace patterns are very basic and manageable for the beginner knitted. Other lace patterns can be extremely detailed. The project you are knitting will dictate the weight of yarn you use, although knitted lace works best with a lace weight yarn made from wool, mohair, or cashmere.

If you are new to knitting, you will need to know the four basic stitches to complete a knitted lace project:

  • Knit. This should be the very first stitch you learn in knitting. 
  • Purl. Once you master the basic knit stitch, the purl should be next. 
  • Yarn Over (yo). This stitch is an increase that leaves a hole. 
  • Knit Two Together (k2tog). Usually paired with the yarn over, the knit two together is a decrease that holds everything together.

Lace knitting uses these holes and lines created to create delicate patterns. The combination of these four stitches will create a lovely knitted lace that a beginner can craft.

Create Knitted Lace

The first step is always to knit a swatch. If you are unclear about why swatches are imperative, check out this article: 3 Reasons Why Knitters of Every Level Should Swatch.

Next, you will select a pattern based on your skill level and interests. If you choose a straight garment, like a scarf, you will need to pair every increase with a decrease so the garment maintains the same number of stitches. If you select a pattern with shape to it, you will change the stitch count and adjust the increases and decreases accordingly. Basic lace designs are formed by knitting the right side and purling back across the wrong side rows. 

A Few Lace Knitting Tips

  • Since your row count may change, count the stitches at the end of each row. Catching the mistake early will make your lace knit experience less frustrating.
  • If your lace pattern is repeating, use stitch markers so that you only have a few stitches to count at one time. 
  • Work in a knitting lifeline if you are a stickler for dropped stitches or are concerned about making mistakes. 
  • Once you complete your lace garment, it may look bunched. That is normal. Hand wash and block your piece and gently stretch as it dries.

You will be hooked after you finish up your first knitted lace project. Adding a lace pattern adds a level of complexity to your knitting that will allow you to take on more intricate projects. What is your favorite knitted lace pattern? Share with us in the comments.



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