Knitters Are Happier People- Here's Why

March 03, 2020 2 min read

Knitters are happier people

As knitters, we proudly exclaim, "Knitters are happier people!" We may seem biased, but we have actual research on our side. There are so many reasons why knitters are happier. 

We're Part of a Community

Whether you are part of a physical knitting group or you have grown an online knitting family, you understand that knitting brings us all together in a special way. The people with whom we knit become our friends and our support group. We share our joys and our sadness and we heal together through our love for knitting needles and gorgeous yarn. Being part of a group makes us happier.

Knitting Reduces Stress

Some people aggressively scrub pots and pans or go for a long run. Here, we knit. Rough day at work? Go home and knit. Disagreement with your spouse? Hide and knit. Worried about a health concern? Knitting will take your mind off of your troubles. And the best part is that, at the end, you will have a beautiful garment to show for it.

Knitters are more relaxed

We Make Our Own Clothes

Being self-sufficient is a beautiful thing. Gardeners experience the same type of happiness that knitters experience from the ability to make useful objects. It is nice when someone compliments you on your clothes, but even better when you actually made the clothes. No one will ever be cold in your family, thanks to your skill.

Introverts Included

A subset of the population, introverts, cringe at the thought of joining a social club. The small talk, the chatter, the obligation to be social is unbearable. Knitting is one of the few hobbies that can be done in groups where sitting quietly is perfectly acceptable. 

Knitting Has a Meditation-Like Effect

Once you move past the initial learning curve of knitting, the rhythmic motion of needlework can induce a relaxed state that Dr. Herbert Benson refers to as “The Relaxation Response.” Unlike meditation, the end result also includes a tangible product. 

Knitting Has Tremendous Health Benefits

Not only has knitting been reported to reduce high blood pressure, it is also associated with relieving symptoms associated with mental illness. Knitters report that it helps relieve their arthritis. A program in Toronto called Knit to Quit uses knitting to help people with smoking cessation. A 2009 study found that women with anorexia who were taught to knit reported significant improvement. The health benefits go on and on. And healthy people are happier people.

Congratulations for choosing a hobby that improves your health and happiness. Now go teach someone how to knit and spread the joy!

 



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